Ziua Porților Deschise în Aurora

14 iulie 2012

10 am – 4 pm

La a saptea aniversare a acestui eveniment in orasul nostru, Biserica Sf. “Patruzeci de Mucenici din Sevastia” are bucuria de a participa, deschizându-și porțile Comunității orașului Aurora și nu numai.

Vizitatorii sunt invitați să descopere Comunitatea Românească și valorile creștine ortodoxe.

The Christian Orthodox Church

IMG_5099_resizeThe history of the Orthodox Church actually begins in the Acts of the Holy Apostles, with the Descent of the Holy Spirit. When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place, praying and celebrating the Divine Liturgy. This community of people gathered for Liturgy is the first functional Church.

Following this event, three thousand people constituted the first Christian community at Jerusalem, headed by St. James, the first Bishop of the city.

Faithful to the Lord’s command to go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, the Apostles went out and preached wherever they went. Christian communities had sprung up in all the main centers of the Roman Empire and beyond.

The southern province of Romania, Scythia Minor, was part of the Roman Empire. Following its breakdown, the province became part of the Byzantine Empire. The first encounter of Christianity in Romania was when St. Apostle Andrew and his disciples passed through it in the first century. Romanian Orthodox Church began to be administrative organized in 4th century, while the Slavic people in the Balkan area became Christian centuries later, Bulgarians in 864 and Russians in 988.

In 1054 occurred one of the greatest tragedies of the Christian world, the Great Schism between the Orthodox and the Roman Catholic Churches. Officially proclaimed at Constantinople in that year by the Papal Legate, Cardinal Humbert, it was, in a sense, the culmination of a process that had been taking place for several centuries.

As in the other Balkan countries, with the independence movement of the 19th Century, the Church of Romania received her independence. The nation became a Principality in 1856, and its Church was organized in 1864. Romania became an independent Kingdom in 1881, and the autocephaly of the Church was finally recognized in 1885 by Patriarch Joachim IV of Constantinople. In 1925, the Church of Romania became a Patriarchate, whose Patriarch lives in Bucharest. In numbers of Orthodox faithful, this Church is the second largest in world Orthodoxy.

DSC_1865_resizeRomanians in Canada

According to the Canadian Census data of 2006, there are almost 200,000 Romanian-Canadians. Some sources estimates that this number might be as high as 400,000 Canadians of Romanian descent.

In 1896-1900, a group of Romanians established themselves to the Saskatchewan, at Clifford Sifton’s advice. As Minister of Home Affairs representing a Liberal Canadian government, he visited Bucovina, Romania, and promised to populate the West of Canada.

In April 1898 the first two Romanian families that migrated to Canada from the Bucovina village of Boian stopped in Alberta. They gave the settlement the name Boian, Alberta.

Romanians came to Canada in several waves. The first period was at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century.

The second period was between 1945–1955, when Romanians came after the World War II, during Communist Romania, at a time when Romania was in a difficult period in its history. In this period, 1,460,000 Romanian citizens left their country. Many of them were political refugees. Many of them left for Canada.

Another wave of Romanian emigration to Canada occurred after 1989 following the Romanian Revolution of 1989, when people obtained the right to leave Romania subsequent to the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe.

IMG_3462Our Church and Romanian Orthodox Church in Canada

Although Romanian Orthodox parishes were in existence in the United States and Canada from the turn of the century, the Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America was established as a Diocese only at a general Church Congress held in the city of Detroit, Michigan, on April 25-28, 1929.

Administratively, the Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America is governed by the Church Congress and the Episcopate Council, both presided by the Hierarch and constituted from representatives of the parishes and of the Auxiliary Organizations.

The first organized Romanian Orthodox Parish in North America was St. Nicholas, built in 1901 in Regina, Saskatchewan.

Holy Forty Martyrs of Sebaste Romanian Orthodox Church was established in Aurora, Ontario in August 16, 2009. The Romanian Community in Aurora is counting over 700 members. Our church is honored to own one of the oldest buildings in Aurora, dated 1870.

The church is decorated with valuable religious objects. We hold copies of ancient icons, works of art from Byzantine, Russian and Romanian iconographers. The pews come from a disused church in Rodney, Ontario. The materials and workmanship prove an age of over hundred years. The altar iconostasis come from Romanian Orthodox Church in Regina where existed for over fifty years. The iconostasis icons are oil painted on canvas by a Serbian artist.

Everything found in our church takes you deep into history. Praying and admiring around, you could discover your heritage and finally yourself.

14 iulie 2012

10 am – 4 pm

La a saptea aniversare a acestui eveniment in orasul nostru, Biserica Sf. “Patruzeci de Mucenici din Sevastia” are bucuria de a participa, deschizându-și porțile Comunității orașului Aurora și nu numai.

Vizitatorii sunt invitați să descopere Comunitatea Românească și valorile creștine ortodoxe.

The Christian Orthodox Church

IMG_5099_resizeThe history of the Orthodox Church actually begins in the Acts of the Holy Apostles, with the Descent of the Holy Spirit. When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place, praying and celebrating the Divine Liturgy. This community of people gathered for Liturgy is the first functional Church.

Following this event, three thousand people constituted the first Christian community at Jerusalem, headed by St. James, the first Bishop of the city.

Faithful to the Lord’s command to go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, the Apostles went out and preached wherever they went. Christian communities had sprung up in all the main centers of the Roman Empire and beyond.

The southern province of Romania, Scythia Minor, was part of the Roman Empire. Following its breakdown, the province became part of the Byzantine Empire. The first encounter of Christianity in Romania was when St. Apostle Andrew and his disciples passed through it in the first century. Romanian Orthodox Church began to be administrative organized in 4th century, while the Slavic people in the Balkan area became Christian centuries later, Bulgarians in 864 and Russians in 988.

In 1054 occurred one of the greatest tragedies of the Christian world, the Great Schism between the Orthodox and the Roman Catholic Churches. Officially proclaimed at Constantinople in that year by the Papal Legate, Cardinal Humbert, it was, in a sense, the culmination of a process that had been taking place for several centuries.

As in the other Balkan countries, with the independence movement of the 19th Century, the Church of Romania received her independence. The nation became a Principality in 1856, and its Church was organized in 1864. Romania became an independent Kingdom in 1881, and the autocephaly of the Church was finally recognized in 1885 by Patriarch Joachim IV of Constantinople. In 1925, the Church of Romania became a Patriarchate, whose Patriarch lives in Bucharest. In numbers of Orthodox faithful, this Church is the second largest in world Orthodoxy.

DSC_1865_resizeRomanians in Canada

According to the Canadian Census data of 2006, there are almost 200,000 Romanian-Canadians. Some sources estimates that this number might be as high as 400,000 Canadians of Romanian descent.

In 1896-1900, a group of Romanians established themselves to the Saskatchewan, at Clifford Sifton’s advice. As Minister of Home Affairs representing a Liberal Canadian government, he visited Bucovina, Romania, and promised to populate the West of Canada.

In April 1898 the first two Romanian families that migrated to Canada from the Bucovina village of Boian stopped in Alberta. They gave the settlement the name Boian, Alberta.

Romanians came to Canada in several waves. The first period was at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century.

The second period was between 1945–1955, when Romanians came after the World War II, during Communist Romania, at a time when Romania was in a difficult period in its history. In this period, 1,460,000 Romanian citizens left their country. Many of them were political refugees. Many of them left for Canada.

Another wave of Romanian emigration to Canada occurred after 1989 following the Romanian Revolution of 1989, when people obtained the right to leave Romania subsequent to the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe.

IMG_3462Our Church and Romanian Orthodox Church in Canada

Although Romanian Orthodox parishes were in existence in the United States and Canada from the turn of the century, the Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America was established as a Diocese only at a general Church Congress held in the city of Detroit, Michigan, on April 25-28, 1929.

Administratively, the Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America is governed by the Church Congress and the Episcopate Council, both presided by the Hierarch and constituted from representatives of the parishes and of the Auxiliary Organizations.

The first organized Romanian Orthodox Parish in North America was St. Nicholas, built in 1901 in Regina, Saskatchewan.

Holy Forty Martyrs of Sebaste Romanian Orthodox Church was established in Aurora, Ontario in August 16, 2009. The Romanian Community in Aurora is counting over 700 members. Our church is honored to own one of the oldest buildings in Aurora, dated 1870.

The church is decorated with valuable religious objects. We hold copies of ancient icons, works of art from Byzantine, Russian and Romanian iconographers. The pews come from a disused church in Rodney, Ontario. The materials and workmanship prove an age of over hundred years. The altar iconostasis come from Romanian Orthodox Church in Regina where existed for over fifty years. The iconostasis icons are oil painted on canvas by a Serbian artist.

Everything found in our church takes you deep into history. Praying and admiring around, you could discover your heritage and finally yourself.

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